Gallery run 3rd June

Lambeth Bridge, St James Park, Green Park, Hyde Park and The Serpentine Gallery to see Alex Katz and Etel Adnan. East to Ibid, Alison Jacques Gallery and Rodeo Gallery. Frith Street, then further East to Stewart Shave and Gagosian. Regent’s Canal and South over Tower Bridge.

221Alex Katz of Timothy Taylor showing at the Serpentine Gallery. This wide portrait is of his wife Ada Katz.

222Christopher Orr at Ibid. Light projections and stacks of books at his studio, we are told, help free up the imagination in the work.

223Etel Adnan of White Cube showing here at Serpentine Gallery. Beautiful bumpy landscapes.

224Lygia Clark at Alison Jacques Gallery. This is the first design for her famous folding aluminium pieces. They represent animals or critters. This was a crab.

225

226Massimo Bartolini uses a rotating projector at Frith Street Gallery along with a soundtrack and bright red neon sign.

227Christodoulos Panayiotou at Rodeo Gallery uses light in this piece overlooking busy Charing Cross road.

228Walter de Maria at Gagosian.

229Torey Thornton at Stuart Shave Modern Art. Childlike imagery is striking.

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Gallery Run 8th January

31Great imagery on the Hertford Union Canal on the way to Brick Lane.

32The Hertford Union Canal gives a good access route to Brick Lane.

33At Beigel Bake on Brick Lane.

34Approach to Lisson Gallery from the Regent’s Canal.

35Susan Hiller at Lisson Gallery.

36Gordon Matta-Clark in the Maisons Fragiles group show at Hauser and Wirth gallery.

37Fabio Mauri’s installation at Hauser and Wirth. You don’t want to walk into the space at first. These are wax models but you don’t know if there are living people amongst them.

38John Hoyland’s painting at Pace London looks hot! A forged steel support in the gallery is in the foreground. During a previous show by Yto Barrada where ornate carpets were laid on the floor, the same columns looked like the supports of a mosque.

39Luisa Lambri at Thomas Dane gallery. She photographed Lygia Clark’s hinged metal-plate artwork. It was interactive in it’s day and gallery visitors could shape it.