Gallery run 29th June

Lambeth Bridge, Tate Britain, then west to RCA show 2016. North over Battersea bridge, Hyde Park and into the Serpentine Pavilion. Pizza in Goodge Street. East to Angel and along the Regent’s canal then south to Bloomberg Space. North to Carl Friedman then onto Herald Street. Finally to opening at Vilma Gold and then back south.
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Jim Isermann of Corvi Mora at Bloomberg Space. Vinyl wall patterns and interacting objects.

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Paula Linke Sunrise at Royal College of Art show 2016. Great placement by the sinks creates doubt!

263
Brian Griffiths at Vilma Gold. Checkered motif and cut up billboards gives a new take to previous tarpaulin works.

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Wolfgang Tillmans at Maureen Paley.

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Serpentine Pavilion.

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Michael Stevenson at Carl Freedman. Flight simulator machine replicas take us on flight journeys and weave in a cultural narrative.

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Pablo Bronstein of Herald Street at Tate Britain. Dancers perform against a classical setting of theatre backdrop and neoclassical colonnades.

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David Schroeter The Seven Stones at Royal College of Art show 2016.

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Nick Relf at Herald Street.

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Parkland Walk, 23rd June

As usual this run is a loop, but unlike the Regent’s Canal circuit described elsewhere, it extends further north to take in Parkland walk. Parkland Walk is a nature reserve created from an old railway used until 1970. Amongst its trees and wildlife, graffiti and nature have rounded off the sharp angular forms of station platforms and decorated the arched bridges that carry criss-crossing roads overhead. Meanwhile, walkers and cyclists barely notice the gentle gradient of this green corridor that rises slowly up to Highgate from Finsbury Park.

From here, the beautiful green space of Hampstead Heath provides the next section of the loop before I arrive at Camden Arts Centre which despite its name is well north of Camden on the Finchley Road. It is hosting Anya Gallaccio and as I wasn’t allowed to get a photo of another group-show inside, am relieved to see her artwork stretched out across the garden, where no photography restriction could possibly apply. As an object it looks like a long, woven, rope structure and even has some similarities to a hammock. This impression is reinforced further by it being draped across the trees in the garden, having extended from the roof terrace space above the garden cafe. With its clear structure of frayed, brown rope that has been joined with knots and cross-links, the real subject of the artwork seems to switch back towards the trees on which it is resting. Somehow the artwork serves as a reminder that the living material over which it is currently draped has an intricacy and strength all of its own.

Whilst Parkland Walk and Anya Gallaccio’s artwork have united to create a theme of nature and its regeneration into cultural artefacts, the next piece at Michael Werner Gallery remains obstinately removed from nature. Jorg Immendorf has painted two figures of children in a cartoon-like idiom that oppose nature through their puffed out cheeks and inflated torsos. They represent a sort of distorted or lost innocence. As the artwork was painted during the Vietnam war, the theme of lost innocence is also historically relevant, though the precise meaning of the image still remains hard to pin down. Formally, the painting is a cut-out round two figures and a pool of water they are sitting in.

Soap suds cascade down these yellow cartoonish torsos and collect on the surface of water, still buoyed by the vigour of a sponge that created them, and then a marvellous little piece of logic unites the yellow of the skin with the blue of the water to determine that the submerged body should necessarily be tinted green. This green and yellow colour palette sets up a system based on the false initial premise of the bright yellow human flesh and lends a sense of disquietude to the image but also a beauty. Then with more false premises acquired for my own artistic ends, it is necessary to make all haste through the busy metropolis and visit the next stop on the run which shall be the RA Schools show in Piccadilly.

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Parkland Walk between Finsbury Park and Highgate. On the way to the Camden Arts Centre.

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Guillermo Kuitca at Hauser and Wirth. The fragmentation cubism-lines become a floor plan.

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Anya Gallaccio of Thomas Dane Gallery showing at Camden Arts Centre. Part of Making and Unmaking show.

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Victoria Morton at Sadie Coles HQ. Colourful images with beautiful recurring motifs.

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Jorg Immendorff at Michael Werner. The babies are iconic symbols of innocence amidst his fierce campaigning against the Vietnam war.

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Nairy Baghramian at Marian Goodman Gallery. The pole structures hold the elements together

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Anna Paterson at RA Schools Show 2016. Oil, pastel and print on aluminium. Another interesting artist at the RA schools show.

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Joseph Grigely shows The Gregory Battcock Archive at Marian Goodman Gallery. Gregory himself is photographed in front of the first plane painted by Alexander Calder for Braniff Airlines in 1972.

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Rafal Topolewski at RA Schools Show 2016. Yellow, Orange and Black and Turn. Great paintings.

Gallery run 16th June

Past Battersea Power Station, Albert Bridge, Hyde Park and East to Green Park and into Pace Gallery. Stephen Friedman, David Zwirner, Thomas Dane and East towards The Barbican. Then East to Whitechapel Gallery and finally South over Tower Bridge.

241Louise Nevelson at Pace London.

242Robert Buck at Stephen Friedman. Yes, the painting is hung as shown.

243

244Keith Sonnier of Pace at Whitechapel Gallery.

245Maria Nepomuceno of Victoria Miro showing at Barbican.

246Francis Alys at David Zwirner kicking a flaming football through the run-down streets of a Mexican town.

247Imran Qureshi of Corvi Mora at Barbican Curve. Miniatures with enlarged marks on the gallery wall and floor.

248Cecily Brown at Thomas Dane. This small piece looks great.

249Invader pixilated image on Curtain Road.

Gallery run 10th June

Listened to Mary Heilman about her exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery the day before. North over Lambeth Bridge to Rob Tufnell. Cafe, bread, meeting about cycle trip to York and on to Hollybush Gardens. Then North East to Regent’s Canal. Wilkinson Gallery, The Approach and South to Brick Lane Bagel-Bake. Opening at Kate Macgarry and back South over Tower Bridge.

231Evan Holloway at The Approach. He usually creates coloured arrays of natural forms. Here is something different.

232Ketty la Rocca at Wilkinson Gallery was a 60’s Italian artist who explored personal identity. Her beautiful black i sculptures are shown here, actually photographed through a separate mirror installation of hers.

233I saw this on Wharf Road.

234Lubaina Himid at Hollybush Gardens with decorated trolleys.

235Mary Heilmann at Whitechapel Gallery with images that are gridded yet expressionist.

236Goshka Macuga at Kate Macgarry with a wool tapestry originally shown at the Berlin Biennale 2014.

237Reto Pulfer at Hollybush Gardens with casually stitched fabrics and dyed canvas.

238Knut Henrik Henriksen at Hollybush Gardens with artwork inspired by packaging.

239Will Benedict at Rob Tufnell with work inspired by a scientist’s battle with the pesticide industry.

Gallery run 3rd June

Lambeth Bridge, St James Park, Green Park, Hyde Park and The Serpentine Gallery to see Alex Katz and Etel Adnan. East to Ibid, Alison Jacques Gallery and Rodeo Gallery. Frith Street, then further East to Stewart Shave and Gagosian. Regent’s Canal and South over Tower Bridge.

221Alex Katz of Timothy Taylor showing at the Serpentine Gallery. This wide portrait is of his wife Ada Katz.

222Christopher Orr at Ibid. Light projections and stacks of books at his studio, we are told, help free up the imagination in the work.

223Etel Adnan of White Cube showing here at Serpentine Gallery. Beautiful bumpy landscapes.

224Lygia Clark at Alison Jacques Gallery. This is the first design for her famous folding aluminium pieces. They represent animals or critters. This was a crab.

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226Massimo Bartolini uses a rotating projector at Frith Street Gallery along with a soundtrack and bright red neon sign.

227Christodoulos Panayiotou at Rodeo Gallery uses light in this piece overlooking busy Charing Cross road.

228Walter de Maria at Gagosian.

229Torey Thornton at Stuart Shave Modern Art. Childlike imagery is striking.

Gallery run 27th May

Visited Art 16 earlier in the week, then did the run. Tower Bridge, Brick Lane and Regent’s Canal. West past Kings Cross and Regent Street to Lisson Grove and along to Lisson Gallery. South to Timothy Taylor, Victoria Miro, Golden Square and Frith Street Gallery. South over Lambeth Bridge, across Walworth Road and through Burgess Park.
211At Art16. Alfredo and Isabela Quilizan produced these flip-flop angel wings.

218Cory Arcangel at Lisson Gallery. The digital displays are altered, the software hacked. The alphabet of corporate symbols is appropriated by the artist.

217Jean Dubuffet at Timothy Taylor. These fab sculptures grew out of red and blue biro doodles, we are told. The artist had made them whilst on the phone.

216Yayoi Kusama at Victoria Miro.

215Massimo Bartolini at Frith Street Gallery. The artist’s sound piece is played on this record player crowned with a brass cube. This unusual addition pays homage to Golden Square, the location of the gallery.

214Dora Maurer at White Cube. The hands form an alphabet of gestures.

213Stephane Graff at Almine Rech. A juxtaposition of text and image that is intended to jar one with the other.

212Galleryrunner saw this house connected to a railway arch near Walworth Road.

219Stanley Whitney at Lisson Gallery. These pastel grids put beauty before formalism.