Gallery run 22/2/19

1301
Tracey Emin at The White Cube Bermondsey until 9th March. Work entitled Another Goodbye in the show A Fortnight of Ashes.

This show focuses on the powerful feelings evoked by love, sex, death and loss. In this piece, located in a room Tracey has renamed the Ashes Room, is a remembrance of the artist’s dead mother.

Remembrance and memory are the themes of this show and the power that they hold over us are clearly visible here. For Tracey, the memorabilia of her past are displayed in glass vitrines, rather like the sealed vessels of Prousts Remembrance of Things Past that hold the long forgotten memories of past habits and routines shared with loved ones. Just as Proust’s vessels burst open when triggered with a sensation often of smell or taste, it looks like these glass vitrines too have been smashed apart and plied their powerful subject matter upon the work in the show.

1302
Staging Jackson Pollock at The Whitechapel Gallery until 24th March. Not so much about the American artist himself as rather a narrative of two intertwining events. Firstly, the display and eventual purchase of a beautiful painting called number 9, Summertime, by the Tate Gallery and secondly the ground breaking exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery back in 1958, of Jackson Pollock’s works, where this painting was originally displayed on a bespoke wall by modernist architect Trevor Dannat. The wall ran right through the middle of the gallery and epitomised the brutalist architecture of the day. Alongside all this archive material is the real thing. Number 9 has been lent back to the Whitechapel for this show and it is still looking resplendent.

1303
Woskerski mural near BrickLane.

1304
Hyon Gyon at Parasol Unit, until 31st March. Work entitled We Were Ugly.

This enormous work running the length of the gallery is composed of 17 styro-foam blocks in the traditional builder’s dimensions of 4 feet wide by 8 feet high. Here the similarities to the building trade comes to an end, however. The bright painted surfaces have been burnt with a soldering iron revealing the blue granular layer that comprises the region behind the picture surface. Paint fuses into this nether world and offers a comparison to the artist’s own psyche, we are told.

1305
Me in front of my works Life In A Cell and Psychic Space exploring the hidden realities in nature and science.
This is my base in Peckham, Ideas Lab and the start point for each #galleryrunner event.

1306
John Korner at Victoria Miro until 23rd March. Work entitled Apples as Architecture, 2019 in the show Life in a Box.

For John Korner, apples are a mini-theme and one that I both recognise and love. Previous apple works are Apple Bombs and Running Along Apples. This mini-collection of apple works also offers a clue as to why this show should seem to be all about dynamism, with its running figures, sports track and climbing-frame bar where you receive free alcohol shots on a Friday afternoon, yet its title Life in a Box should simultaneously seem so static. The apples in Korner’s paintings are not strictly still, but pulse across the picture surface leaving behind their glowing after-images. Thus grids and boxes as exemplified by these vibrant apples are therefore only temporary states. Everything is ultimately dynamic and changing.

1307
Peter Joseph at Lisson Gallery, until 2nd March. Work entitled Dark Blue, Mushroom, Light Blues, Greens and Yellow 2016

These enigmatic works give little away on an intellectual level but nevertheless show the acute aesthetic sensitivity of a 90 year old artist at the top of his game.

1308
Liu Xiaodong at Lisson Gallery, until 2nd March. Work entitled Weight of Insomnia (Beijing) 2016, in the show Weight of Insomnia.

In a glass vitrine we see a typed proposal for a kind of painting machine, three in fact, that could work tirelessly for several weeks depicting three different landscapes from digital images captured by CCTV. By a certain good fortune one of these CCTV regions would be outside the artist’s own apartment and is the image shown here.
This and the other two images were a great success in the artist’s native China and the project continued to grow, incorporating iconic squares and public spaces in many other countries. The machines are still painting night and day, and one of them is even on show and at work in the present exhibition, where we see scaffolding, some delicate wires, a kind of makeshift print-head and finally a small laptop displaying the CCTV image providing the electronic subject matter of its current painting of Nelson’s Column and Trafalgar Square.

1309
Miroslav Balka at White Cube, until 9th March. Show title, Random Access Memory.

Walls are the theme of many news stories currently and here we have two. They are made of corrugated metal sheet, heated to a temperature of 45 degrees, which apparently is the temperature at which the enzymes within organisms begin to denature and their cells die, but when this temperature is delivered by objects resembling giant radiators, they actually feel lovely to rest against. Random Access Memory, the type used by computers to store data, is the show title that adds a more sinister note to these giant structures straddling the galleries.

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Gallery run 17th August

1261
Franz Ackermann of White Cube showing memories as a vortex of bright colours.

1262
Ellen Altfest of White Cube with an intense depiction in oil paint of fibres in a fabric.

1263
Eddie Peake at White Cube with a striking image using reflective paint and slogan.

1264
Sign near Tower Bridge.

1265
Katja Novitskova at Whitechapel Gallery with an installation that combines mechanical rocking chairs for babies, shown, along with images of cells and capitalism.

1266
Michael Armitage of White Cube with an image of armed terrorists in a shopping centre.

1269
Georg Baselitz of White Cube with a delicate image.

1267
Volker Huller at Timothy Taylor

1268
Antoni Tapies at Timothy Taylor with the canvas detached from the support and then knotted together.

Gallery run 2nd August

1241
Anna-Bella Papp of Stuart Shave Modern Art with clay tableaux.

1242
Katy Moran of Stuart Shave Modern Art showing abstract paintings based, I think, on overpainting decorative paintings found at markets.

1243
Tim Stoner at Stuart Shave Modern Art with delicate charcoal drawings, and paintings, of Hackney and France.

1244
Ida Ekblad of Herald Street with bright images made, I believe, from bright melted plastics.

1245
Mathew Cerletty at Herald Street with a great painting of a sports image.

1246
Hunter Reynolds at Hales Gallery with stitched pictures of clouds. As the artist lost many friends through AIDS these stitched photos have taken many forms ranging from (impractical) hospital blankets to happy memories.

1247
Gabriella Boyd at Whitechapel Gallery London Open 2018 with paintings depicting awkward moments in relationships.

1248
Ayan Farah who I believe has previously shown with Almine Rech, now showing at Whitechapel Gallery in London Open 2018.

1249
Hannah Brown at Whitechapel Gallery London Open 2018 with very life-like paintings of a park.

Gallery run 26th April

1111
Rezi Van Lankveld of Approach Gallery with great surreal, abstract paintings.

1112
Evren Tekinoktay at The Approach.

1113
Spencer Finch of Lisson Gallery showing at Whitechapel Gallery in Art For The Elizabeth Line.

1114
Paloma Varga Weisz of Sadie Coles HQ showing at Whitechapel Gallery.

1115
Maria Bartuszova of Alison Jacques showing at Whitechapel Gallery.

1116
Sondra Perry at Serpentine Galleries with a reinterpretation of a tragic event, originally depicted by Turner, of sick and weakened slaves being thrown overboard a ship to cash in on insurance payouts.

1117
Stefanie Heinze at Saatchi Gallery.

1118
Chris Hood at Saatchi Gallery.

1119
Pasta hanging off sculpture in preparation for studio lunch, with machine in the foreground. Iconic Peckham show with ArtCPGalleria.

Gallery run 9th November

After a run through St James’ park and spotting a black swan, which in 1738 was used as an example by philosopher David Hume of an inconceivable event of such rarity that it might as well be compared to the Earth no longer orbiting the sun, today’s run continues northwards to the first gallery of the day. The galleries themselves are subject to similar laws of induction that aroused the attention of Hume, whereby oft repeated events start to seem almost necessary in the future, and in this vein, today’s planning takes into account that it would be almost inconceivable that White Cube gallery and Marian Goodman should not open at 10am, Sadie Coles HQ and Thomas Dane galleries would not open at 11am and Mother’s Tank Station would not open at 12 noon, though in the case of the latter there is slightly less inductive certainly of this owing to the status of the gallery as a relative newcomer.

With an itinerary set out, then, for the arrival at each gallery shortly after their respective opening times, the run is under way. First stop is White Cube. Haim Steinbeck has made elaborate shelves that look almost like triangular plinths. He has then arranged objects on them and in many cases even embedded the objects into smaller triangular plinths that nestle into the larger ones, fitting snuggly due to their precision of craftsmanship. The press release claims that these resting and embedded objects evoke nebulous associations reminiscent of how words function in a sentence. As a witty addition to this worthy aim, the current show uses surfboard fins in a variety of different coloured plastics. They have been flipped over whence they resemble the fins of sharks, the bane of any surfer, and function as a cipher for the commodified terror that has permeated our popular culture with films like Jaws. Elsewhere and with the clock confidently past 10am Marian Goodman gallery is hosting Hiroshi Sugimoto. This artist has photographed movie theatres and music halls incorporating a white projector screen as both focal point and also sole light source. Appearing as brightly lit, white rectangles these screens have in fact acquired the illusion of being white through the conjunction of the flickering forms of an actual movie and the long exposure of the artist’s photograph.

As the clock strikes 12 noon, Mother’s Tank station seems to be strangely elusive. The SatNav dot is directly above my location and then a glance upwards reveals the viaduct that straddles Farringdon road and which defines the upper level of the City’s geography at this point upon which Mother’s Tankstation is also situated. Yuri Pattison has excavated into the fixtures and fittings of the gallery’s temporary space and created small cavities. A square ceiling panel is casually pushed to one side whilst on the floor, tiny traces of carpet adhesive accompany the occasional excavations downwards. Circuit boards and computer screens populate this strange part-hidden world and on these circuit boards, which are fully functioning, software creates migrating crowds of tiny figures which interact with each other and even, as the gallery assistant tells us, commit a few murders.

Finally, at Whitechapel Gallery a small show of previously stored artworks is enjoying a rare exposure to the public. Michael Borreman’s hoodie portrait is stunning whilst Jim Lambie’s red and and silver bags is equally impressive . It is assembled, one assumes, into some sort of soul, since the secondary theme of this show is portraiture. Lambie’s piece actually evokes the feeling that it has been seen before which either means that this is the case or, more impressively perhaps, that it hasn’t been seen before, since this after all is the remit of the show, and that instead it has acquired its sense of familiarity by actually tapping into some sort of fundamental truth which simply makes it seem familiar.

891
Black swan and white swan in St. James’ Park.

892
Haim Steinbach of White Cube with wall mounted arrangements of objects that create associations like sentences.

893
Hiroshi Sugimoto at Marian Goodman Gallery with photos of old cinemas. The artist has used long exposures whilst a film plays in the cinema he is photographing, causing the cinema screen to appear white.

894
Thomas Schutte of Frith Street Gallery with glass busts blown in the Murano workshops of Venice.

895
Catherine Opie of Thomas Dane Gallery with intimate photographic portraits.

896
Yuri Pattison of Mother’s Tank Station with computer screen imbedded in the gallery ceiling which is showing crowds of small figures. These are generated by a computer programme and can be observed acting in certain ways and with certain objectives.

897
Ad Minoliti at Project Native Informant with an installation of painted wall and two inkjet reproduced images.

898
Jim Lambie of Sadie Coles HQ at Whitechapel Gallery.

899
Michael Borremans of David Zwirner with a typical hidden face painting, at Whitechapel Gallery.

Gallery run 29th July

First stop today is Matt’s Gallery near Tower Bridge. Willlie Doherty has produced a video work on show here that juxtaposes on two screens, both the arrival of arms in Donegal prior to the Easter uprising in Ireland and also the location in Dublin where the revolutionaries were holed up in 1916. The centenary of that event seems to be the inspiration for this work and reminds me of another recent and important work on the Easter uprising by Jaki Irvine at Frith Street Gallery. Round the corner in Bermondsey Street is White Cube and there is a big mixed show of female artists. The theme is surrealism and the curating principle is that, just as the female body has been depicted by male artists as an external form and often disfigured by the removal of the hands and head for example, the female mind as an internal presence can through art describe and depict important realities whilst engaging in the discourse of surrealism. In short the work is fab. Stand-out artworks include Tracey Emin’s bronze statue with a slight alteration to one of the legs, and two great painters. Caitlin Keogh has made images of single female figures with various attachments including ropes and small male figures on puppet strings. The appearance is slick and has a flat graphic quality but with little touches of paint to provide the details. Meanwhile next door there is another piece that I try to identify from the exhibition catalogue. However due to its slightly unusual editing, wherein it has focused on the general work of the artists rather than the individual pieces, I still don’t know who it is by. With thirty or forty artists on show, I need to ask the gallery assistant to identify the artwork. She obligingly does with a well worn A4 sheet and a numbering system extending well beyond 150. Jordan Kasey has painted a fan with tassels that stream in the direction of an adjacent female figure, all of which has been depicted with a loose but precise application of oil paint.

Across Tower Bridge is the Whitechapel Gallery where in the main space, Benedict Drew is showing work based on the economic theory of the Trickle Down Effect. There are some large cartoon-like paintings on giant pieces of banner-vinyl whilst in the middle of the space is a podium of glitzy objects, though with some distortions to the tableau such as a giant veiny eyeball which acts as a device to remove some of the glitz on closer inspection. Clearly the artist is not a fan of the Trickle Down Phenomenon. Next door, Emma Hart has been to Italy with an awarded residency and has expanded her ceramic practice to include some specialised techniques. The ceramics are like lamp shades in practice, since they cleverly project speech bubbles through their openings onto the gallery floor and with surprisingly sharp outlines, but they are also beautiful objects in themselves. Externally they have simple designs on their surface but on the brightly lit interiors the colours are extremely vivid and maybe this is where her newly acquired expertise has found its application.

After the brief jog up Brick Lane and a quick lunch at Bagel Bake which has now finished its refurbishment, though they haven’t replaced the clock on the new grey tiles yet, I decide to put in the legwork and head for Trafalgar Square. The National Portrait Gallery has artworks by some important contemporary artists, including by Alessandro Raho, who has painted Dame Judi Dench, and by Marlene Dumas, who has envisaged a stunning portrait of Oscar Wilde. Finally, in the National Gallery next door, I find Chris Ofili’s large woven tapestry. A documentary with Alan Yentob has laid the foundation already in describing the three year period over which the professional weavers added different coloured pixels using a thick woollen weave even recreating the random marks of graphite powder that stand aside from the main composition in the original sketches. But seeing the artwork in situ it looks like an alter piece and the dim lighting adds a further sense of being in a chapel. Two figures are placed at the bottom of deserted cliffs amongst empty glades creating a depiction of nature that whilst being classical in composition, is decidedly modern with respect to its style and colour palette.

 

751
Willie Doherty at Matt’sGallery with work about the 1916 Easter uprising in Dublin.

752
Tracey Emin of White Cube in a group show called Dreamers Awake.

753
Caitlin Keogh at White Cube in a group show called Dreamers Awake.

754
Jordan Kasey at White Cube in a group show Dreamers Awake.

755
Benedict Drew at Whitechapel Gallery with artworks about a rather questionable economic theory called the Trickle Down Effect.

756
Emma Hart at Whitechapel Gallery.

757
Alessandro Raho of Alison Jacques Gallery with a portrait of Dame Judi Dench at National Portrait Gallery.

758
Marlene Dumas of Frith Street Gallery with a depiction of Oscar Wilde.

759
Chris Ofili at The National Gallery with a hand-woven tapestry.

Gallery run 17th March

River Thames to Hackney.

589
Sam Durant at Sadie Coles HQ with protest slogans made beautiful in light boxes.

588
Claudio Parmiggiani at Simon Lee Gallery with a soot print made from a fire in a specially set up library. These prints are on boards that were placed behind the shelves and books and then the soot wafted through.

587
Roberto Matta at Robilant Voena with psychic landscapes and imagery that inspired the surrealists.

586
Rodney Graham at Canada Gallery in Canada House. A survey of his work.

585
Alicja Kwade at Whitechapel Gallery with celestial imagery using iPhones that rotate but continually use their orientation sensor to pick out the correct region of space in front of themselves to depict on the screen.

584
Jaki Irvine at Frith Street Gallery with a sound and video installation. It has a song she wrote herself in a traditional Irish style. Also there is an historic account of the 1916 Easter rising in Southern Island. Though risking execution as traitors many women took part and the artist celebrates them here.

583
Chris Succo at Almine Rech Gallery with paint and spray paint compositions from life.

582
Georg Baselitz at Michael Werner showing work from 77-92 and continuing a relationship with the gallery that goes back to the early 60’s.

581
Lisa Brice at Stephen Friedman Gallery showing blue drawing paintings of women in contemplative poses usually unaware of any external viewer.