Gallery run 21st September

1291
Mary Webb at Hales Gallery with explorations of colour using rectangles as a recurring motif.

1292
Heidi Bucher at Parasol Unit with latex castings of interior spaces.

1293
Bit of a litter problem on Regent Street.

1294
Martine Syms at Sadie Coles with a wall piece that reads in the clockwise direction around the gallery and creates a stream of consciousness revealing amusing moments of self doubt.

1295
Kemang Wa Lehulere at Marian Goodman with images and sculpture based on South African strife.

1296
Bob And Roberta Smith at Royal Academy Of Arts with some large scale works, including these door pieces.

1297
Harold Ancart at David Zwirner with sublime paintings of glaciers.

1298
Daniel Richter of Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac with paintings inspired by figures and abstraction.

1299
Gary Simmons of Simon Lee with images that suggest the cinema. Names of black actors and their films have undergone a process of partial erasure.

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Gallery run 23rd August

1271
Tracy Emin of White Cube with a delicate bird on pole sculpture. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1272
Simon Periton of Sadie Coles HQ with a delicate cut-out made from painted metal sheet. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1273
Conrad Shawcross of Victoria Miro Gallery with a labyrinth. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1274
Rachel Feinstein of Gagosian Gallery with a florid sculpture set in Regent’s Park at the Frieze Sculpture Park.

1275
Virginia Overton of White Cube with fab artwork reminiscent of blue collar fabrication. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1276
Bharti Kher of Hauser And Wirth at Frieze Sculpture Park.

1277
John Baldessari of Marian Goodman Gallery with a 6’7” penguin. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1278
Kiki Smith has created a figure out of a fairy tale. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1279
Elmgreen And Dragset of Galerie Perrotin at Frieze Sculpture Park.

Gallery run 5th July

1211
Rosa Loy at The Approach with great German symbolic realism.

1212
Kasper Bosmans at The Approach with a small cosmic-looking painting. Fab piece.

1213
Brick Lane doorway. Love it, by the way!

1214
Collier Schorr of Stuart Shave Modern Art in a reclining pose for a selfie.

1215
Cosmic! Michelle Stuart at Alison Jacques Gallery with a grid made in 1969 and inspired by the moon.

1216
Keren Cytter of Pilar Corrias with imaginative use of reflective sheet that turns the gallery floor into a sort of makeshift projector screen helped by the intense spotlights coupled with dim over-lighting.

1217
Urs Fischer of Sadie Coles HQ with iPhone artworks showing the wit of the artist.

1218
Leonor Antunes at Marian Goodman Gallery with screens based on architectural and art motifs including those of Anni Albers.

1219
Juan Munoz of Frith Street Gallery with vividly drawn objects.

Gallery run 10th May

1131
Beatriz Milhazes at White Cube with a 15m long tapestry in her characteristic style.

1132
JeffKeen at Kate MacGarry with an early example of spliced 8mm film intercut with animation.

1133
Birgit Jurgenssen of Alison Jacques Gallery with delicately presented photographs using gauze fabrics to give a soft focus and welded metal frames which she made herself.

1134
Wilhelm Sasnal at Sadie Coles HQ with paintings in his distinctive style.

1135
Christian Boltanski at Marian Goodman with films of interventions and installations in deserted landscapes.

1136
Juan Usle of Frith Street Gallery with delicate brushwork.

1137
Rose Wylie at David Zwirner with evocative paintings made from the artist’s memory and images she finds in her studio.

1138
Alvaro Barrington at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac with paintings and sketches.

1139
Joseph Beuys at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac with a big retrospective and here a transformer and felt installation.

Gallery run 29th March

Greenwich Foot Tunnel is the gateway to the Isle of Dogs. Here the perimeter of the City Farm allows a sort of detachment from the nearby main roads, before a short excursion along the River Thames leads to The Regent’s Canal and another 20 minutes of peace and harmony. At Stuart Shave’s gallery, Eva Rothschild has made enormous sculptural pieces to harmonise with the internal space.

A watery theme continues with Jessica Warboys at Frith Street Gallery. She has created some great canvases using the sea as a fluid medium to move pigments around and to deposit additional silt-like particles of matter onto their surfaces. They have a delicate appearance with rhythmic patterns that make them look as though they were actually being viewed through water.

Finally the day is capped off with the much awaited arrival of this year’s fourth plinth sculpture. Michael Rakowitz has a majestic sculpture on view made up of old date box labels. Their localised bursts of colour, and exotic providence, have been used to recreate a Syrian sculpture that was recently destroyed.

1071
Eva Rothschild of Stuart Shave with various sculptural objects carefully presented in the space.

1072
Ricky Swallow of Stuart Shave with cast bronze objects based on incidental interior features.

1073
Jessica Warboys at Frith Street Gallery with images made by immersing pigmented canvases in the sea.

1074
Marvin Gaye Chetwynd of Sadie Coles HQ with gothic imagery based on bats and theatre props presented against flat photo backdrops.

1075
Thomas Struth of Marian Goodman with a photo of physics objects that would make one’s hair stand on end.

1076
Cristina Iglesias of Marian Goodman with a hard looking cage-like structure which on closer inspection is delicate and made of a granular substance that actually smells quite nice.

1077
Giuseppe Penone of Marian Goodman with a characteristic adaptation of a natural object.

1078
John Riddy of Frith Street Gallery with photo images of stained brickworks made during a stroll through South London.

1079
The fourth plinth has arrived. Michael Rakowitz has built a replacement for the original stone treasure recently destroyed, out of tin cans.

Gallery run 7th February

The Regent’s Canal highway describes a sort of subjective experience of running on the towpath between Hackney and Regent’s Park. Though not particularly fast in the physical sense the towpath seems quick in a kind of existential sense, namely that with several galleries dotted along its route a sensation of speed is produced by the sheer lack of things that need to be done or thought about during the journey. A few glances at boats, the occasional meandering daydream is all that separates one gallery on the canal from the next. Suddenly the finger is on the buzzer awaiting entry to Victoria Miro Gallery. Jorge Pardo, who is of Cuban American extraction and now living in Mexico, is showing wall-mounted structures that resemble beautifully coloured screens. They are painted, but not in a traditional sense, for the colour emerges from an interaction of minute speckles of paint which have either been created from abrasions into a surface of many layers or, and this seems the case here, have in fact been created completely intentionally by a programmed computer and application device. A thin hair’s-breadth groove around each speckle provides the clue that the speckles themselves have been applied with deliberate intent. On a larger scale, that is on the scale of the entire objects, we see rhythmic patterns running right across their surfaces. Waves and flow lines appear as the eye scans the intricately cut plastic and fibrous sheets. For the lamps this experience is enhanced further by the presence of the interior light source which provides a strong contrast between material and void. In addition this light source promotes a change of geometry in the object. Rather than being planar, as was the case with the wall mounted works, these lamp-like objects are radial. Intricately cut sheets of coloured plexi-glass fan out from the centre, like an elaborate array of coloured cooling fins, conveying their subtle glows to the object’s fragmented surface.

Back on the canal highway, Regent’s Park soon offers a route south to the West End. At Simon Lee Gallery, there is a display of the late works by Hans Hartung. Accompanying this display is a film that shows the artist in a wheel chair, since he is an old man, spraying and flicking paint across large expanses of canvas. Known for his gestural abstraction, the artist is now using a prosthetic device comprising a stick wand and spray nozzle. In the gallery we see the result and how the artist succeeds in his express intention of mimicking the forces of nature. Partly these forces reside within the paint itself causing the drops to cling to one another or else suddenly break free as though they were a shower of ejecting particles, but there is a deeper connection to nature too, manifest most clearly when the work has taken on more complex forms such as a spiral motif in one outstanding example. Here it is as though the artist has attuned himself to the various rhythms that define the universe itself allowing him to represent the more complex forces that create the various spinning and oscillating systems around us.

With Corvi Mora and Greengrassi galleries pairing up this month, several artists are on display in the main viewing space and it requires careful checking of the paperwork to determine which gallery is associated with which artist. Tatsuo Ikeda who as it turns out is with Greengrassi, though in previous years has also exhibited with the blue-chip giant Gagosian, has produced surreal drawings of figures sporting various limbs for locomotion, as well as prosthetic cones. The artwork is very proficient, which allows us not only to enjoy the images, but also to engage with the various distortions of nature without rejecting them on the grounds of incredulity. The images are therefore accepted on account of their near photographic-like appearance. As a passing observation it seems that the two dominant features of these works, namely their Surrealism and their Realism of execution, turn out to be unlikely bedfellows, despite the apparent contradiction of these two terms.

1001
Jorge Pardo at Victoria Miro with laser cut plastic in exotic lamps that nevertheless look very traditional.

1002
Pablo Bronstein of Herald Street Gallery showing drawings at RIBA of pseudo-Georgian architecture.

1003
Matt Saunders of Marian Goodman Gallery.

1004
Hans Hartung at Simon Lee Gallery with paintings from late in his career made using spray nozzles and paint-covered olive branches that he could manipulate from his wheelchair.

1005
Estate near Greengrassi and Corv iMora galleries looking resplendent against a blue sky this afternoon.

1006
Tatsuo Ikeda at Greengrassi group show for Condo 2018.

1007
Kye Christensen Knowles at Corvi Mora and Greengrassi group show as part of Condo 2018.

1008
John Lindell at Corvi Mora for Condo 2018.

1009
Sable E Smith at Greengrassi and Corvi Mora group show as part of Condo 2018.

Gallery run 9th November

After a run through St James’ park and spotting a black swan, which in 1738 was used as an example by philosopher David Hume of an inconceivable event of such rarity that it might as well be compared to the Earth no longer orbiting the sun, today’s run continues northwards to the first gallery of the day. The galleries themselves are subject to similar laws of induction that aroused the attention of Hume, whereby oft repeated events start to seem almost necessary in the future, and in this vein, today’s planning takes into account that it would be almost inconceivable that White Cube gallery and Marian Goodman should not open at 10am, Sadie Coles HQ and Thomas Dane galleries would not open at 11am and Mother’s Tank Station would not open at 12 noon, though in the case of the latter there is slightly less inductive certainly of this owing to the status of the gallery as a relative newcomer.

With an itinerary set out, then, for the arrival at each gallery shortly after their respective opening times, the run is under way. First stop is White Cube. Haim Steinbeck has made elaborate shelves that look almost like triangular plinths. He has then arranged objects on them and in many cases even embedded the objects into smaller triangular plinths that nestle into the larger ones, fitting snuggly due to their precision of craftsmanship. The press release claims that these resting and embedded objects evoke nebulous associations reminiscent of how words function in a sentence. As a witty addition to this worthy aim, the current show uses surfboard fins in a variety of different coloured plastics. They have been flipped over whence they resemble the fins of sharks, the bane of any surfer, and function as a cipher for the commodified terror that has permeated our popular culture with films like Jaws. Elsewhere and with the clock confidently past 10am Marian Goodman gallery is hosting Hiroshi Sugimoto. This artist has photographed movie theatres and music halls incorporating a white projector screen as both focal point and also sole light source. Appearing as brightly lit, white rectangles these screens have in fact acquired the illusion of being white through the conjunction of the flickering forms of an actual movie and the long exposure of the artist’s photograph.

As the clock strikes 12 noon, Mother’s Tank station seems to be strangely elusive. The SatNav dot is directly above my location and then a glance upwards reveals the viaduct that straddles Farringdon road and which defines the upper level of the City’s geography at this point upon which Mother’s Tankstation is also situated. Yuri Pattison has excavated into the fixtures and fittings of the gallery’s temporary space and created small cavities. A square ceiling panel is casually pushed to one side whilst on the floor, tiny traces of carpet adhesive accompany the occasional excavations downwards. Circuit boards and computer screens populate this strange part-hidden world and on these circuit boards, which are fully functioning, software creates migrating crowds of tiny figures which interact with each other and even, as the gallery assistant tells us, commit a few murders.

Finally, at Whitechapel Gallery a small show of previously stored artworks is enjoying a rare exposure to the public. Michael Borreman’s hoodie portrait is stunning whilst Jim Lambie’s red and and silver bags is equally impressive . It is assembled, one assumes, into some sort of soul, since the secondary theme of this show is portraiture. Lambie’s piece actually evokes the feeling that it has been seen before which either means that this is the case or, more impressively perhaps, that it hasn’t been seen before, since this after all is the remit of the show, and that instead it has acquired its sense of familiarity by actually tapping into some sort of fundamental truth which simply makes it seem familiar.

891
Black swan and white swan in St. James’ Park.

892
Haim Steinbach of White Cube with wall mounted arrangements of objects that create associations like sentences.

893
Hiroshi Sugimoto at Marian Goodman Gallery with photos of old cinemas. The artist has used long exposures whilst a film plays in the cinema he is photographing, causing the cinema screen to appear white.

894
Thomas Schutte of Frith Street Gallery with glass busts blown in the Murano workshops of Venice.

895
Catherine Opie of Thomas Dane Gallery with intimate photographic portraits.

896
Yuri Pattison of Mother’s Tank Station with computer screen imbedded in the gallery ceiling which is showing crowds of small figures. These are generated by a computer programme and can be observed acting in certain ways and with certain objectives.

897
Ad Minoliti at Project Native Informant with an installation of painted wall and two inkjet reproduced images.

898
Jim Lambie of Sadie Coles HQ at Whitechapel Gallery.

899
Michael Borremans of David Zwirner with a typical hidden face painting, at Whitechapel Gallery.