Gallery run 5th June

Marylyn Molisso at Tension Fine Art.
Exciting new show at a gallery that supports experimental art in South East London.

Street art meets canal boat on Islington stretch of Regent’s Canal.

On the water near Kings Cross, propane tanks aglow.

Laure Prouvost at Lisson Gallery with text on a corner.

Faith Ringgold at Serpentine Gallery with poignant painted canvases integrated into stitched, quilted, borders.

Faith Ringgold at Serpentine Gallery with paintings showing powerful narratives. A burning ship and its trade are the very symbols of injustice.

Faith Ringgold holds court and all of our attention at Serpentine Gallery today as she discusses her work there.

Shelagh Cluett at Greengrassi with delicate, sea-creature-like sculptures.

David Lieske at Corvi Mora.

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Gallery run 22nd May

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Zaha Hadid design for the Sackler Gallery where we met for a press view this morning.

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Luchita Hurtado at The Serpentine Gallery with beautiful studies of light. There are also fine figurative works and amazing abstracts in this retrospective of a woman who met artists from all the great artistic movements of the last century whilst resolutely pursuing her own ideas.

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Anish Kapoor at Lisson Gallery with large scale stone works exhibited in the gallery’s courtyard. They look stunning in the summer sun.

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Jason Martin at Lisson Gallery with bands of paint that remind me of newly laid snow snagging occasionally on small protrusions.

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Fergus Polglase at Central Saint Martins graduate show. Great tongue-in-cheek abstract painting of a motorbike road trip.

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Navid Nuur at Parasol Unit with blown up doodles from those scribble pads where customers try out the new pens. We are all graffiti artists when we are not thinking about it.

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Frank Bowling at Hales Gallery with abstracts reminiscent of the artist’s native Grenada. A warning is struck too as the iridescent water sometimes has rubbish strewn across the surface portrayed playfully by collage.

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Near Brick Lane. Was in the prospect of a bagel or this fab mural that injected energy into those flagging limbs?

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Sarah Morris at White Cube Gallery with an installation that reminds me of artificial intelligence.

Gallery run 22/2/19

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Tracey Emin at The White Cube Bermondsey until 9th March. Work entitled Another Goodbye in the show A Fortnight of Ashes.

This show focuses on the powerful feelings evoked by love, sex, death and loss. In this piece, located in a room Tracey has renamed the Ashes Room, is a remembrance of the artist’s dead mother.

Remembrance and memory are the themes of this show and the power that they hold over us are clearly visible here. For Tracey, the memorabilia of her past are displayed in glass vitrines, rather like the sealed vessels of Prousts Remembrance of Things Past that hold the long forgotten memories of past habits and routines shared with loved ones. Just as Proust’s vessels burst open when triggered with a sensation often of smell or taste, it looks like these glass vitrines too have been smashed apart and plied their powerful subject matter upon the work in the show.

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Staging Jackson Pollock at The Whitechapel Gallery until 24th March. Not so much about the American artist himself as rather a narrative of two intertwining events. Firstly, the display and eventual purchase of a beautiful painting called number 9, Summertime, by the Tate Gallery and secondly the ground breaking exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery back in 1958, of Jackson Pollock’s works, where this painting was originally displayed on a bespoke wall by modernist architect Trevor Dannat. The wall ran right through the middle of the gallery and epitomised the brutalist architecture of the day. Alongside all this archive material is the real thing. Number 9 has been lent back to the Whitechapel for this show and it is still looking resplendent.

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Woskerski mural near BrickLane.

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Hyon Gyon at Parasol Unit, until 31st March. Work entitled We Were Ugly.

This enormous work running the length of the gallery is composed of 17 styro-foam blocks in the traditional builder’s dimensions of 4 feet wide by 8 feet high. Here the similarities to the building trade comes to an end, however. The bright painted surfaces have been burnt with a soldering iron revealing the blue granular layer that comprises the region behind the picture surface. Paint fuses into this nether world and offers a comparison to the artist’s own psyche, we are told.

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Me in front of my works Life In A Cell and Psychic Space exploring the hidden realities in nature and science.
This is my base in Peckham, Ideas Lab and the start point for each #galleryrunner event.

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John Korner at Victoria Miro until 23rd March. Work entitled Apples as Architecture, 2019 in the show Life in a Box.

For John Korner, apples are a mini-theme and one that I both recognise and love. Previous apple works are Apple Bombs and Running Along Apples. This mini-collection of apple works also offers a clue as to why this show should seem to be all about dynamism, with its running figures, sports track and climbing-frame bar where you receive free alcohol shots on a Friday afternoon, yet its title Life in a Box should simultaneously seem so static. The apples in Korner’s paintings are not strictly still, but pulse across the picture surface leaving behind their glowing after-images. Thus grids and boxes as exemplified by these vibrant apples are therefore only temporary states. Everything is ultimately dynamic and changing.

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Peter Joseph at Lisson Gallery, until 2nd March. Work entitled Dark Blue, Mushroom, Light Blues, Greens and Yellow 2016

These enigmatic works give little away on an intellectual level but nevertheless show the acute aesthetic sensitivity of a 90 year old artist at the top of his game.

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Liu Xiaodong at Lisson Gallery, until 2nd March. Work entitled Weight of Insomnia (Beijing) 2016, in the show Weight of Insomnia.

In a glass vitrine we see a typed proposal for a kind of painting machine, three in fact, that could work tirelessly for several weeks depicting three different landscapes from digital images captured by CCTV. By a certain good fortune one of these CCTV regions would be outside the artist’s own apartment and is the image shown here.
This and the other two images were a great success in the artist’s native China and the project continued to grow, incorporating iconic squares and public spaces in many other countries. The machines are still painting night and day, and one of them is even on show and at work in the present exhibition, where we see scaffolding, some delicate wires, a kind of makeshift print-head and finally a small laptop displaying the CCTV image providing the electronic subject matter of its current painting of Nelson’s Column and Trafalgar Square.

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Miroslav Balka at White Cube, until 9th March. Show title, Random Access Memory.

Walls are the theme of many news stories currently and here we have two. They are made of corrugated metal sheet, heated to a temperature of 45 degrees, which apparently is the temperature at which the enzymes within organisms begin to denature and their cells die, but when this temperature is delivered by objects resembling giant radiators, they actually feel lovely to rest against. Random Access Memory, the type used by computers to store data, is the show title that adds a more sinister note to these giant structures straddling the galleries.

Gallery run 10th July

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Angela De La Cruz of Lisson Gallery with paintings and metal shutters pulled off their frames.

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Christopher Le Brun at Lisson Gallery with abstract paintings. Some have the paint applied straight from the tube which leaves pleading scratch marks from the nozzles.

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Edward Keinholz at Blain Southern with sculptures from found objects.

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Alex Hartley of Victoria Miro with two-layer paintings combining foliage and architecture.

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Pipilotti Rist at Hauser and Wirth. Trust me!

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Fischli and Weiss at Hauser Wirth with a giant vase.

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Alexander Calder at Ordovas with a black flower mobile.

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Cindy Sherman of Sprueth Magers with film star style self portraits. A hint of cleverly contrived faded glamour too.

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Lydia Okumura at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac with a retrospective. Made with painted wire mesh.

Gallery run 17th May

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Ian Cheng of Pilar Corrias at Serpentine Gallery with animated figures that follow their own wills created by AI programming.

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Hermann Nitsch at Massimo De Carlo with paintings inspired by controversial performances by the artist, involving public dissections of bulls and other animals intertwined with religious themes.

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Sarah Cain at Timothy Taylor with great abstract paintings.

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Markus Lupertz of Michael Werner with a series of tent paintings he made in the 60’s from catalogue photos.

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Newly decorated phone box outside Lisson Gallery.

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Mary Corse at Lisson Gallery with highly reflective paintings that use micro glass beads familiar from road signs.

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Richard Long of Lisson Gallery with a flint circle.

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A radiant glow from a government building no less.

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Dieter Roth at Rob Tufnell with a piece referencing the Daily Mirror newspaper.

Gallery run 26th April

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Rezi Van Lankveld of Approach Gallery with great surreal, abstract paintings.

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Evren Tekinoktay at The Approach.

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Spencer Finch of Lisson Gallery showing at Whitechapel Gallery in Art For The Elizabeth Line.

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Paloma Varga Weisz of Sadie Coles HQ showing at Whitechapel Gallery.

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Maria Bartuszova of Alison Jacques showing at Whitechapel Gallery.

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Sondra Perry at Serpentine Galleries with a reinterpretation of a tragic event, originally depicted by Turner, of sick and weakened slaves being thrown overboard a ship to cash in on insurance payouts.

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Stefanie Heinze at Saatchi Gallery.

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Chris Hood at Saatchi Gallery.

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Pasta hanging off sculpture in preparation for studio lunch, with machine in the foreground. Iconic Peckham show with ArtCPGalleria.

Gallery run 13th April

Like last week, this Gallery-Run-write-up has been reduced to the individual photo captions, shown further down the page, in order to make room for a temporary project called Plus 1 that now follows. Guests join me, hopefully, on a gallery run and will share ideas. Alas there are still no takers, though admittedly I still haven’t really asked anyone else yet, beyond the hopeful invitations shown last week. This week’s article features something entirely different, though still comprising a sort of plus 1, whilst also verging on the confessional! For two months I learnt the names of artists associated with London-Frieze-exhibiting galleries, from lists of paper whilst out jogging being careful not to run into lampposts or pedestrians. Each list could be hand-held and studied. Some even show the effects of rain or of being stuffed into a pocket. Along with a two word summary of something that each artist did, the process helped to create a stack of memory boxes that follows the sequence of the numbered lists shown in the photograph below. The memory boxes automatically bring forth the next in the stack, provided they are cycled through in recall about once every fortnight. The boxes also bring with them an essence of each artist, since they have gradually filled up with experiences of gallery visits. Memory is a strange thing and this sequential recall is probably born through the need to piece together consecutive events in time, something the philosopher David Hume considered to be the rather unphilosophical survival function that shapes the human brain.

listsThe Lists Cycle. Gallery Runner lists in the foreground.

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Pablo Bronstein of Herald Street Gallery with a film that crosses the glam game show format with some of the grand narratives of Greek mythology.

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Bernard Cohen at Flowers Gallery.

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Elizabeth Murray of Pace Gallery showing at Victoria Miro with what looks like biological imagery on the shaped canvas.

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Joan Mitchell at Victoria Miro in a group show.

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Carlos Garaicoa at Parasol Unit with reconstructions of tiled Cuban adverts, albeit with a few alterations.

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Fab boat in Camden.

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Ryan Gander of Lisson Gallery with carved shapes from an important mathematical blueprint. Meanwhile the black pile of sand steadily grows during the show from a thin stream of sand falling out of a hole in the ceiling.

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Pedro Reyes of Lisson Gallery with a room full of sculpture and wall tableaux forming a complete system of ideas, some executed and some pending.

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Ian Cheng of Pilar Corrias showing at Serpentine Galleries. We see what appears to be a simple animation but gradually learn that the creature is living in real time and using a sort of AI to try things out and get used to its rather unusual body.