Gallery run 23rd August

1271
Tracy Emin of White Cube with a delicate bird on pole sculpture. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1272
Simon Periton of Sadie Coles HQ with a delicate cut-out made from painted metal sheet. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1273
Conrad Shawcross of Victoria Miro Gallery with a labyrinth. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1274
Rachel Feinstein of Gagosian Gallery with a florid sculpture set in Regent’s Park at the Frieze Sculpture Park.

1275
Virginia Overton of White Cube with fab artwork reminiscent of blue collar fabrication. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1276
Bharti Kher of Hauser And Wirth at Frieze Sculpture Park.

1277
John Baldessari of Marian Goodman Gallery with a 6’7” penguin. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1278
Kiki Smith has created a figure out of a fairy tale. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

1279
Elmgreen And Dragset of Galerie Perrotin at Frieze Sculpture Park.

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Gallery run 17th August

1261
Franz Ackermann of White Cube showing memories as a vortex of bright colours.

1262
Ellen Altfest of White Cube with an intense depiction in oil paint of fibres in a fabric.

1263
Eddie Peake at White Cube with a striking image using reflective paint and slogan.

1264
Sign near Tower Bridge.

1265
Katja Novitskova at Whitechapel Gallery with an installation that combines mechanical rocking chairs for babies, shown, along with images of cells and capitalism.

1266
Michael Armitage of White Cube with an image of armed terrorists in a shopping centre.

1269
Georg Baselitz of White Cube with a delicate image.

1267
Volker Huller at Timothy Taylor

1268
Antoni Tapies at Timothy Taylor with the canvas detached from the support and then knotted together.

Gallery run 7th June

1171
Helen Beard at Newport Street Gallery with brightly coloured figures in intimate settings.

1172
Sadia Laska at Newport Street Gallery with artwork referencing the New York music and cultural scene.

1173
Boo Saville at Newport Street Gallery with vividly painted found images from Google searches on the internet.

1174
Seung Taek Lee at White Cube with great sculptures made from brightly coloured vinyl sheet stretched over sculptural supports.

1175
Julian Schnabel at Pace Gallery has painted expressive black marks reminiscent (to me) of ploughs and pitch forks, on blown-up prints that originally celebrated country life. The prints were made by a Royal Academician and for those in the know Pace shares a building with the RA who are celebrating 250 years and this body of work is a nod to that anniversary.

1176
Adboulaye Konate of Blain Southern showing at Stephen Friedman Gallery in a group show that celebrates African art and culture.

1177
Florence Mytum at Slade postgraduate show. The stone structures of the art school’s architecture have been softened with extruded sponge.

1178
Gabriela Giroletti at Slade postgraduate show.

1179
Charlie Barlow at Slade postgraduate show with clusters of spots all over the corridors and even into the loo.

Gallery run 10th May

1131
Beatriz Milhazes at White Cube with a 15m long tapestry in her characteristic style.

1132
JeffKeen at Kate MacGarry with an early example of spliced 8mm film intercut with animation.

1133
Birgit Jurgenssen of Alison Jacques Gallery with delicately presented photographs using gauze fabrics to give a soft focus and welded metal frames which she made herself.

1134
Wilhelm Sasnal at Sadie Coles HQ with paintings in his distinctive style.

1135
Christian Boltanski at Marian Goodman with films of interventions and installations in deserted landscapes.

1136
Juan Usle of Frith Street Gallery with delicate brushwork.

1137
Rose Wylie at David Zwirner with evocative paintings made from the artist’s memory and images she finds in her studio.

1138
Alvaro Barrington at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac with paintings and sketches.

1139
Joseph Beuys at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac with a big retrospective and here a transformer and felt installation.

Gallery run 23rd March

A classic stop-off point is Brick Lane, at Beigel Bake to be more precise, where apple strudel costs just 80p. From here I move on from some of the galleries in the east of London towards the west end and on the way encounter Hollybush Gardens in Farringdon. On show is Turner Prize winner, Lubaina Himid. The room is full of wall paintings extending onto some additional objects propped upright on the floor. It is fascinating that the original utility of these painted objects, such as piano lid, is still immediately recognisable.

Jogging west past Holborn, the Mayfair galleries are finally reached. David Zwirner on Grafton Street is hosting Andrzej Wroblewski, a Polish artist who oozes Eastern Block charm. His Chauffeur series features drivers with their back turned to the viewer. A Gauguinesque blaze of colour near the driver’s head appears to demarcate that area of the vehicle window where the subject’s own psyche has intervened into this external world.

Then doubling back slightly, for a reason I can no longer remember since this is a slightly stripped down and edited re-write, Sophie Von Hellermann has been exhibiting some lovely loose paintings at Pilar Corrias. Formally of Vilma Gold, which shut last Autumn, the artist has found a good replacement with this gallery on Eastcastle Street.

1061
Lubaina Himid of Hollybush Gardens with a painted piano lid.

1062
Jose Damasceno of Thomas Dane Gallery with a small intervention on the eyes of Brazilian money-prints.

1063
Pier Paola Calzolari at White Cube who uses refrigeration units in his sculptures to produce pure whites.

1064
Mel Bochner at Mazzoleni Gallery.

1065
Andrzej Wroblewski at David Zwirner with an image from his Chauffeur series.

1066
Roy Newell at Simon Lee Gallery with meticulously worked miniature paintings.

1067
Michelangelo Pistoletto of Simon Lee Gallery with shelving images on his characteristic mirror backgrounds.

1068
Jean Dubuffet at Timothy Taylor with one his familiar cellular-based sculptures.

1069
Sophie Von Hellermann of Pilar Corrias with colourful paintings from the imagination.

Gallery run 9th March

The day begins with a jog up to White Cube Gallery in Mason’s Yard. Minjung Kim has used traditional Korean craft techniques to lay down layers of ultra-thin mulberry tree paper into rhythmic compositions. The paper has many uses outside of art in the artist’s native country including as window panes, due to its strength even in thin layers allowing light to diffuse between the various natural fibres. Downstairs, the artworks are vividly coloured. The paper has been dyed and applied in layers, with each piece burnt along one edge in a ritualistic gesture by the artist, one that we are told is accompanied by the smell of incense and a discipline of complete silence. The overall effect on the artworks is to create textured regions of intense colour reminiscent of flowers and natural vegetation.

In Sprueth and Magers just across Piccadilly, Anthony McCall is displaying a light installation. His use of a smoke-like mist in these light-works, allows the experience to be a 3D one rather than just the conveyance of an image from one flat medium, a digital Jpeg in a projector, to a screen on the far wall. Yes, the screen is still present as the final destination for the image, but the light wends its way through wisps of smoke, like in those cigarette-friendly cinemas of one’s youth, catching the little eddies of particles on the way, creating straight shimmering beams of light across the room. The image itself is simple enough, a single line that is curved into an ellipse, sometimes perfectly rounded, sometimes dislocated into a stepped join between end and beginning, but the transition between the two is captivating as the digital projector slowly cycles from the one to the other.

At Grosvenor Hill a few hundred metres further on, is the Gagosian Gallery. A burst of applause echoes from within the furthest room. Glenn Brown had given me a great tutorial twenty years ago and he is instantly recognisable as the same chap. With his address to a group of visitors in the background and my own sketchy knowledge of some of his main artistic concerns gleaned during that generous four hour tutorial, the work on display takes on an extra depth. The painting is ultra flat as many of us would be familiar with, whilst the waxy trails of paint from the historical canon he explores, are simulated with intricate brushwork. These labour intensive works used to net the artist just a couple of pounds an hour, a fact which he presented as a footnote to the precarious business of being an artist, during the aforementioned tutorial. It was interesting to hear from this address that whilst the paintings are still labour intensive, twenty years later, the intricate sketching style of some of the accompanying drawings is actually very quick to execute. Here, expertise of his medium appears to have allowed the artist to bend some of those time constraints of the beautiful painted works, and create an image that takes on the same rapid fluidity as those very lines he has imitated.

A second major gallery sits just round the corner and is the home of Almine Rech. Gunther Forg has several large photographs on display of variously imposing buildings. These are neo-classical in style and each is emblazoned with a title depicting the particular institution it houses. Whilst the titles such as GEOLOGIA and MUSICA are true to the original photographs, rendered in various block capitals in concrete or metal, and sitting above the grand entranceways, they nevertheless form a more extended and general index of knowledge, one which is familiar to us from library shelves and TV documentaries. Meanwhile, the buildings have a grand scale themselves, both in their photographic representation and in their actual physical size. Presented together along one wall, the images appear monumental and we get that rare sense of an illusionistic space that is actually bigger than the expansive gallery it has been presented in.

1041
Minjung Kim at White Cube who makes images from thin layers of mulberry tree paper.

1042
Tonico Lemos Auad of Stephen Friedman.

1043
Bjarne Melgaard of Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac with recently finished work that fills the room with an aroma of linseed oil and paint from their drying surfaces.

1044
Sturtevant at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac.

1045
Anthony McCall at Sprueth Magers with slowly moving light projections, which uses a smoke-like substance in addition to a screen, to capture the image. The public are encouraged to move through the space and disrupt the image.

1046
Bosco Sodi of Blain Southern with a piece at Philips.

1047
Glenn Brown of Gagosian showing paintings where the brush marks of oil paint are simulated with a flat almost photographic surface.

1048
Gunther Forg of Almine Rech.

1049
Sculptures on Grosvenor Hill.

Gallery run 15th February

Gallery runs by artist, jogger and London explorer Julian.

Gagosian Gallery, which is on Brittania Street near Kings Cross, has been between exhibitions for several weeks and the two present shows by Nancy Rubins and Vera Lutter are therefore much awaited. They don’t disappoint! The scale of work by both artists is stunning. For Nancy Rubins the scale requires engineering solutions to hold her sculptures together. Assembled metal objects originating from scrap yards and fairgrounds are secured to a network of cross linking metal cables. These cables allow the sculptures to project way beyond the relatively small plinths that they sit upon. Furthermore, the placement of these cables forms an elaborate system of cantilevers which incorporate the various objects on display into their design. The art objects then, rather like Calder’s mobiles, serve both as surface for contemplation as well as physical mass within this larger system.

In contrast Vera Lutter’s works, whilst being physically large, draw their true impact from the scale of the machinery that underpins them. Her works are giant negatives which are about 3.5 metres high, roughly 100 times the height of old fashioned film negatives. It is of no surprise, therefore, that the object she has used for a camera carries a similar multiplication of scale. It’s a shipping container no less. The various expanses of photographic negative before us in the gallery are a sort of physical trace of the walls of this container that they would have been stuck against during their exposure and on this account they bring with them a sense of the magnitude of the container itself, its steel plate and enormous mass. If this double reading were not enough, though, the artist has then presented yet another level of engagement with the images. For they are of the world’s largest radio telescope and this creates a powerful metaphor of observation through use of only the faintest of signals. The faint traces of energy from outer space would be equivalent in some way to the almost imperceptible light reaching the pieces of film inside the container.

The next section of the run is over the hill at Angel. This means leaving the canal behind as it disappears into a very long tunnel and hot-footing it across to the other side. Back by the water, another lock serves to drop its level, before a spur of water branches out sideways past Victoria Miro gallery. A great show by David Altmejd at Stuart Shave Modern Art, a gallery slightly further on, is followed by a return to the canal and a visit to Stuart Shave’s second gallery space in Hackney. Paul Lee has produced several combinations of canvas and tambourines, the latter being a familiar trope for the artist, and they have an interesting sensuous quality due to a sort of exchange of physical properties from their close proximity. The tightly stretched skins of both objects, both sitting about 2 inches away from the wall, unite to produce a sort of extended space across their combined surfaces.

In contrast to these, the artist has produced four wall-mounted objects that appear, at first sight, to be no more than a cluster of recyclables, fabrics and bits of wire. However, they have a great sense of freedom to their forms, something that would require either chance processes for their assembly or else the application of sound artistic principles to block any unwanted rational processes of repetition, use of pre-established pattern or over reliance on an external narrative. None of these deficiencies here and what’s more for good measure, the central core of each object, which may well have been fashioned from a fizzy drink can, offers the one-off surprise to a viewer taking a closer look, that they are actually portraits of a male face rendered in black screen print style ink. Though small, this figurative element offers a strong contrast to their constructivist style.

1011
Antonio Calderara at Lisson Gallery.

1012
On the Regent’s Canal. A new layer of image just added with the yellow sign.

1013
Nancy Rubins of Gagosian Gallery.

1014
Vera Lutter of Gagosian Gallery with images of one of the world’s largest radio telescopes made using a giant pinhole camera constructed from a shipping container.

1015
David Altmejd of Stuart Shave, Modern Art with plaster reliefs inspired by the complex biological evolutions of organisms.

1016
Paul Lee of Stuart Shave, Modern Art.

1017
Eddie Peake of White Cube with an immersive installation.

1018
He Xiangyu of White Cube with small clusters of wire and pieces of metal that had benn smuggled out of North Korea to China for a pitifully small cash price.

1019
Andrea G Artz has produced novel photographic origami pieces at Crol And Co.