Gallery run 22nd November

Michael E Smith of Stuart Shave Modern Art with daily objects in unusual juxtapositions plus an unexpected theremin.

This week’s run has an extension panel to the map. It is via a lovely stretch of grassland called Parkland Walk. You enter at Highgate and exit at Finsbury Park with the illusion of having crossed from north west London to north east London in a matter of minutes. (In reality Highgate is not that far west, Finsbury Park is not that far East whilst the duration is nearer half an hour. This is the route of a disused tube line.

Incidental mobile homes on a Peckham Street.

Anselm Kiefer at White Cube with interesting vitrines that use cables to create the vegetal forms plus there are a few complicated looking equations written on the glass.

Trix and Robert Haussmann at Herald Street with colourful remakes of an iconic furniture design. There is also some mirror effect on the bases.

Patricia Tribe at Kate MacGarry with about twenty perfect brush strokes, and many rubbings out.

Christodoulos Panayiotou of Rodeo Gallery at Camden Arts Centre. These electricity poles had a few attachments on still and smelt pleasantly of creosote.

Leake Street.

Gallery run 17th September

Harmony Hammond at White Cube Official with great abstract works based partly on the materiality of canvas and other fabrics.

Dora Maurer at White Cube Official with colourful shaped canvases.

Mona Hartoum at White Cube Official . When by chance a woman was leading a tour of this show, I did a quick google search and her characteristic curly hair revealed it was in fact the artist. Fascinating tour I had tagged onto and here is something the artist described as being almost a self portrait… any guesses?

Goshka Macuga at Kate Macgarry with works that on first sight seem based on the theme of weaving. However, the deeper reference is computing and the artist explains that there are many connections between the information needed to weave fabrics mechanically and that of the old computer punch cards. Surprisingly the pioneer of such technology was a not a male we have heard about, such as Charles Babbage, but rather a woman living in the early 1800’s.

Cui Jie of Pilar Corrias with paintings of Chinese viewing platforms and architecture.

Yoshimoto Nara and David Shrigley of #StephenFriedman with cartoon-like drawings that depict clever or witty ideas.

Jasmine Thomas Girvan at David Zwirner with intricate figurative sculptures shown alongside the paintings of Chris Ofili.

Chris Ofili at David Zwirner with figurative paintings including this great piece.

A wheel of sorts and it’s a big one.

Gallery run 22nd May

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Zaha Hadid design for the Sackler Gallery where we met for a press view this morning.

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Luchita Hurtado at The Serpentine Gallery with beautiful studies of light. There are also fine figurative works and amazing abstracts in this retrospective of a woman who met artists from all the great artistic movements of the last century whilst resolutely pursuing her own ideas.

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Anish Kapoor at Lisson Gallery with large scale stone works exhibited in the gallery’s courtyard. They look stunning in the summer sun.

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Jason Martin at Lisson Gallery with bands of paint that remind me of newly laid snow snagging occasionally on small protrusions.

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Fergus Polglase at Central Saint Martins graduate show. Great tongue-in-cheek abstract painting of a motorbike road trip.

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Navid Nuur at Parasol Unit with blown up doodles from those scribble pads where customers try out the new pens. We are all graffiti artists when we are not thinking about it.

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Frank Bowling at Hales Gallery with abstracts reminiscent of the artist’s native Grenada. A warning is struck too as the iridescent water sometimes has rubbish strewn across the surface portrayed playfully by collage.

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Near Brick Lane. Was in the prospect of a bagel or this fab mural that injected energy into those flagging limbs?

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Sarah Morris at White Cube Gallery with an installation that reminds me of artificial intelligence.

Gallery run 22/2/19

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Tracey Emin at The White Cube Bermondsey until 9th March. Work entitled Another Goodbye in the show A Fortnight of Ashes.

This show focuses on the powerful feelings evoked by love, sex, death and loss. In this piece, located in a room Tracey has renamed the Ashes Room, is a remembrance of the artist’s dead mother.

Remembrance and memory are the themes of this show and the power that they hold over us are clearly visible here. For Tracey, the memorabilia of her past are displayed in glass vitrines, rather like the sealed vessels of Prousts Remembrance of Things Past that hold the long forgotten memories of past habits and routines shared with loved ones. Just as Proust’s vessels burst open when triggered with a sensation often of smell or taste, it looks like these glass vitrines too have been smashed apart and plied their powerful subject matter upon the work in the show.

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Staging Jackson Pollock at The Whitechapel Gallery until 24th March. Not so much about the American artist himself as rather a narrative of two intertwining events. Firstly, the display and eventual purchase of a beautiful painting called number 9, Summertime, by the Tate Gallery and secondly the ground breaking exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery back in 1958, of Jackson Pollock’s works, where this painting was originally displayed on a bespoke wall by modernist architect Trevor Dannat. The wall ran right through the middle of the gallery and epitomised the brutalist architecture of the day. Alongside all this archive material is the real thing. Number 9 has been lent back to the Whitechapel for this show and it is still looking resplendent.

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Woskerski mural near BrickLane.

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Hyon Gyon at Parasol Unit, until 31st March. Work entitled We Were Ugly.

This enormous work running the length of the gallery is composed of 17 styro-foam blocks in the traditional builder’s dimensions of 4 feet wide by 8 feet high. Here the similarities to the building trade comes to an end, however. The bright painted surfaces have been burnt with a soldering iron revealing the blue granular layer that comprises the region behind the picture surface. Paint fuses into this nether world and offers a comparison to the artist’s own psyche, we are told.

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Me in front of my works Life In A Cell and Psychic Space exploring the hidden realities in nature and science.
This is my base in Peckham, Ideas Lab and the start point for each #galleryrunner event.

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John Korner at Victoria Miro until 23rd March. Work entitled Apples as Architecture, 2019 in the show Life in a Box.

For John Korner, apples are a mini-theme and one that I both recognise and love. Previous apple works are Apple Bombs and Running Along Apples. This mini-collection of apple works also offers a clue as to why this show should seem to be all about dynamism, with its running figures, sports track and climbing-frame bar where you receive free alcohol shots on a Friday afternoon, yet its title Life in a Box should simultaneously seem so static. The apples in Korner’s paintings are not strictly still, but pulse across the picture surface leaving behind their glowing after-images. Thus grids and boxes as exemplified by these vibrant apples are therefore only temporary states. Everything is ultimately dynamic and changing.

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Peter Joseph at Lisson Gallery, until 2nd March. Work entitled Dark Blue, Mushroom, Light Blues, Greens and Yellow 2016

These enigmatic works give little away on an intellectual level but nevertheless show the acute aesthetic sensitivity of a 90 year old artist at the top of his game.

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Liu Xiaodong at Lisson Gallery, until 2nd March. Work entitled Weight of Insomnia (Beijing) 2016, in the show Weight of Insomnia.

In a glass vitrine we see a typed proposal for a kind of painting machine, three in fact, that could work tirelessly for several weeks depicting three different landscapes from digital images captured by CCTV. By a certain good fortune one of these CCTV regions would be outside the artist’s own apartment and is the image shown here.
This and the other two images were a great success in the artist’s native China and the project continued to grow, incorporating iconic squares and public spaces in many other countries. The machines are still painting night and day, and one of them is even on show and at work in the present exhibition, where we see scaffolding, some delicate wires, a kind of makeshift print-head and finally a small laptop displaying the CCTV image providing the electronic subject matter of its current painting of Nelson’s Column and Trafalgar Square.

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Miroslav Balka at White Cube, until 9th March. Show title, Random Access Memory.

Walls are the theme of many news stories currently and here we have two. They are made of corrugated metal sheet, heated to a temperature of 45 degrees, which apparently is the temperature at which the enzymes within organisms begin to denature and their cells die, but when this temperature is delivered by objects resembling giant radiators, they actually feel lovely to rest against. Random Access Memory, the type used by computers to store data, is the show title that adds a more sinister note to these giant structures straddling the galleries.

Gallery run 23rd August

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Tracy Emin of White Cube with a delicate bird on pole sculpture. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

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Simon Periton of Sadie Coles HQ with a delicate cut-out made from painted metal sheet. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

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Conrad Shawcross of Victoria Miro Gallery with a labyrinth. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

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Rachel Feinstein of Gagosian Gallery with a florid sculpture set in Regent’s Park at the Frieze Sculpture Park.

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Virginia Overton of White Cube with fab artwork reminiscent of blue collar fabrication. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

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Bharti Kher of Hauser And Wirth at Frieze Sculpture Park.

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John Baldessari of Marian Goodman Gallery with a 6’7” penguin. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

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Kiki Smith has created a figure out of a fairy tale. At Frieze Sculpture Park.

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Elmgreen And Dragset of Galerie Perrotin at Frieze Sculpture Park.

Gallery run 17th August

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Franz Ackermann of White Cube showing memories as a vortex of bright colours.

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Ellen Altfest of White Cube with an intense depiction in oil paint of fibres in a fabric.

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Eddie Peake at White Cube with a striking image using reflective paint and slogan.

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Sign near Tower Bridge.

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Katja Novitskova at Whitechapel Gallery with an installation that combines mechanical rocking chairs for babies, shown, along with images of cells and capitalism.

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Michael Armitage of White Cube with an image of armed terrorists in a shopping centre.

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Georg Baselitz of White Cube with a delicate image.

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Volker Huller at Timothy Taylor

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Antoni Tapies at Timothy Taylor with the canvas detached from the support and then knotted together.

Gallery run 7th June

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Helen Beard at Newport Street Gallery with brightly coloured figures in intimate settings.

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Sadia Laska at Newport Street Gallery with artwork referencing the New York music and cultural scene.

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Boo Saville at Newport Street Gallery with vividly painted found images from Google searches on the internet.

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Seung Taek Lee at White Cube with great sculptures made from brightly coloured vinyl sheet stretched over sculptural supports.

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Julian Schnabel at Pace Gallery has painted expressive black marks reminiscent (to me) of ploughs and pitch forks, on blown-up prints that originally celebrated country life. The prints were made by a Royal Academician and for those in the know Pace shares a building with the RA who are celebrating 250 years and this body of work is a nod to that anniversary.

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Adboulaye Konate of Blain Southern showing at Stephen Friedman Gallery in a group show that celebrates African art and culture.

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Florence Mytum at Slade postgraduate show. The stone structures of the art school’s architecture have been softened with extruded sponge.

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Gabriela Giroletti at Slade postgraduate show.

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Charlie Barlow at Slade postgraduate show with clusters of spots all over the corridors and even into the loo.