Gallery run 23rd January

Richard Artschwager at Gagosian !!!

Alex Katz at Timothy Taylor.

Ruth Asawa at David Zwirner. She studied at Black Mountain College and developed these intricately woven sculptures.

Benode Behari Mukherjee at David Zwirner with drawings and collages made after he went blind in the late 50’s.

Leake Street.

Adam Buick at Corvi Mora as part of Condo Art.

Juha Pekka Matias Laakkonen at Corvi Mora with a woven rope floor sculpture.

Pae White at Corvi Mora with a vivid. Embroidered, fabric artwork.

Ellen Gronemeyer at Greengrassi with delicate paintings.

Gallery run 18th December

The Old Kent Road tank has had a new paint job. Photographed at the beginning of today’s run. Thank you @julianlowepaintings for telling me about the new paint job.

Egg-shaped sculpture by the River Lee. Who is the artist?

Ed Baynard at Stephen Friedman Gallery with stylised still-lifes.

Jessi Reaves at Herald Street with re-purposed household items elevated to high art.

Bruce Conner at Thomas Dane Gallery with rapidly changing images, some forming coherent sequences others seemingly random.

Ana Jotta at Greengrassi with intriguing combinations of objects that also have a theatrical feel to them.

Glenn Sorensen of Corvi Mora with images that seem like glimpses of nature.

Chris Gilvan Cartwright at Bloomberg New Contempories.

Xiuching Tsay at Bloomberg New Contempories.

Gallery run 5th June

Marylyn Molisso at Tension Fine Art.
Exciting new show at a gallery that supports experimental art in South East London.

Street art meets canal boat on Islington stretch of Regent’s Canal.

On the water near Kings Cross, propane tanks aglow.

Laure Prouvost at Lisson Gallery with text on a corner.

Faith Ringgold at Serpentine Gallery with poignant painted canvases integrated into stitched, quilted, borders.

Faith Ringgold at Serpentine Gallery with paintings showing powerful narratives. A burning ship and its trade are the very symbols of injustice.

Faith Ringgold holds court and all of our attention at Serpentine Gallery today as she discusses her work there.

Shelagh Cluett at Greengrassi with delicate, sea-creature-like sculptures.

David Lieske at Corvi Mora.

Gallery run 28th June

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Roger Hiorns of Corvi Mora with works based on the human figure.

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Pae White of Greengrassi with, yes, Doritos embedded into a block and cast in nylon.

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Rae Hicks at RCA MA show.

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Tom Kaniok at RCA MA show with great, bold forms.

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Lydia Boehm at RCA MA show with vivid gestural paintings that address the viewer almost like signs.

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Alvin Ong at RCA MA show.

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Christo and Jeanne Claude at The Serpentine with an exhibition of their barrel projects to accompany their giant Mastaba which is floating on the water near by.

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Josh Pye at Royal Academy School’s show.

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Thomas Langley at Royal Academy school’s show. Let’s get straight to the point!

Gallery run 5th April

To start the Plus1 series, several invites have been made and sent out to people in the art world. This is perhaps the fantasy aspect of this project but sets out some of the key markers that define what Gallery Runner is about. This week features two of the best invites sent out. Alas, for the reader expecting a co-runner already, there are no takers yet. Fingers crossed on this one. Cards went to amongst others, Hans Ulrich Obrist of The Serpentine Gallery and Victoria Siddall of Frieze, featuring on the front covers the best Gallery Runner images acquired from the various shows they staged.

HansSerpentine Gallery, best of.

VictoriaFrieze, best of.

The images from my solo run are shown below and were harvested from a run up to Hackney along the Regent’s Canal. Here Hales Gallery featured and then slightly west, Beers UK. Then we see two artists at BlainSouthern. Michael Werner features on the western flank of the run close to Hyde Park, whilst the run due south brings us to Corvi Mora and Greengrassi. The respective photos of the eight artists showing at these galleries are shown below along with the various captions that have already been used on Instagram.

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Sebastiaan Bremer of Hales Gallery with altered photographs modified through the application of minute drops of paint on the surfaces.

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Daniel Jensen at Beers London with sculptures made from simple everyday materials.

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Mark Posey at Beers London with delicate paintings of still-lifes.

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Wim Wenders of Blain Southern with a selection of his many Polaroids taken during his film-making.

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Gabriella Boyd at Blain Southern with slightly surreal paintings.

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A.R.Penck of Michael Werner with colourful paintings from the 1980’s when the artist had finally crossed from East Germany to the west.

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Government building near Westminster actually looking rather good in the afternoon sun today.

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Myra Greene at Corvi Mora with small photographic portraits that use pigment on glass, a process used 150 years ago and a hint too at the important freedoms won for slaves in the US by Lincoln at the same historic period.

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David Musgrave of Greengrassi with illusionistic paintings of peeling paint.

Gallery run 7th February

The Regent’s Canal highway describes a sort of subjective experience of running on the towpath between Hackney and Regent’s Park. Though not particularly fast in the physical sense the towpath seems quick in a kind of existential sense, namely that with several galleries dotted along its route a sensation of speed is produced by the sheer lack of things that need to be done or thought about during the journey. A few glances at boats, the occasional meandering daydream is all that separates one gallery on the canal from the next. Suddenly the finger is on the buzzer awaiting entry to Victoria Miro Gallery. Jorge Pardo, who is of Cuban American extraction and now living in Mexico, is showing wall-mounted structures that resemble beautifully coloured screens. They are painted, but not in a traditional sense, for the colour emerges from an interaction of minute speckles of paint which have either been created from abrasions into a surface of many layers or, and this seems the case here, have in fact been created completely intentionally by a programmed computer and application device. A thin hair’s-breadth groove around each speckle provides the clue that the speckles themselves have been applied with deliberate intent. On a larger scale, that is on the scale of the entire objects, we see rhythmic patterns running right across their surfaces. Waves and flow lines appear as the eye scans the intricately cut plastic and fibrous sheets. For the lamps this experience is enhanced further by the presence of the interior light source which provides a strong contrast between material and void. In addition this light source promotes a change of geometry in the object. Rather than being planar, as was the case with the wall mounted works, these lamp-like objects are radial. Intricately cut sheets of coloured plexi-glass fan out from the centre, like an elaborate array of coloured cooling fins, conveying their subtle glows to the object’s fragmented surface.

Back on the canal highway, Regent’s Park soon offers a route south to the West End. At Simon Lee Gallery, there is a display of the late works by Hans Hartung. Accompanying this display is a film that shows the artist in a wheel chair, since he is an old man, spraying and flicking paint across large expanses of canvas. Known for his gestural abstraction, the artist is now using a prosthetic device comprising a stick wand and spray nozzle. In the gallery we see the result and how the artist succeeds in his express intention of mimicking the forces of nature. Partly these forces reside within the paint itself causing the drops to cling to one another or else suddenly break free as though they were a shower of ejecting particles, but there is a deeper connection to nature too, manifest most clearly when the work has taken on more complex forms such as a spiral motif in one outstanding example. Here it is as though the artist has attuned himself to the various rhythms that define the universe itself allowing him to represent the more complex forces that create the various spinning and oscillating systems around us.

With Corvi Mora and Greengrassi galleries pairing up this month, several artists are on display in the main viewing space and it requires careful checking of the paperwork to determine which gallery is associated with which artist. Tatsuo Ikeda who as it turns out is with Greengrassi, though in previous years has also exhibited with the blue-chip giant Gagosian, has produced surreal drawings of figures sporting various limbs for locomotion, as well as prosthetic cones. The artwork is very proficient, which allows us not only to enjoy the images, but also to engage with the various distortions of nature without rejecting them on the grounds of incredulity. The images are therefore accepted on account of their near photographic-like appearance. As a passing observation it seems that the two dominant features of these works, namely their Surrealism and their Realism of execution, turn out to be unlikely bedfellows, despite the apparent contradiction of these two terms.

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Jorge Pardo at Victoria Miro with laser cut plastic in exotic lamps that nevertheless look very traditional.

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Pablo Bronstein of Herald Street Gallery showing drawings at RIBA of pseudo-Georgian architecture.

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Matt Saunders of Marian Goodman Gallery.

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Hans Hartung at Simon Lee Gallery with paintings from late in his career made using spray nozzles and paint-covered olive branches that he could manipulate from his wheelchair.

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Estate near Greengrassi and Corv iMora galleries looking resplendent against a blue sky this afternoon.

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Tatsuo Ikeda at Greengrassi group show for Condo 2018.

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Kye Christensen Knowles at Corvi Mora and Greengrassi group show as part of Condo 2018.

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John Lindell at Corvi Mora for Condo 2018.

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Sable E Smith at Greengrassi and Corvi Mora group show as part of Condo 2018.

Gallery run 15th November

With a lap round The Serpentine in Hyde Park taking the time up to ten o’clock, the first gallery of today’s run should now be open. But alas, my check of opening times on the internet last night was not done accurately enough and it turns out the gallery is in fact closed today for refurbishments. Fortunately one of their artists, Sanford Biggers, is showing just a few hundred metres away at Phillips auction house. The good fortune of spotting the gallery artist in this alternative venue is further enhanced by the quality of the work. It comprises a delicately stitched, embroidered quilt cover with a back story that it was donated to the artist along with many others from families whose ancestors were effected by slavery. This has become part of the rich historical narrative of the artwork itself.

A few blocks along in Victoria Miro, Stan Douglas is displaying photographic-based work. Although primarily the show focuses on high-resolution photographic reconstructions of the London riots of 2011, there are also two abstract works. These additional abstract works are fascinating because they are actually based on simple jpeg images of geometric shapes but where the information of the original digital files has been altered in a systematic way. The resulting rhythmic patterns, we are told, reveal the wave patterns that make up the structure of all jpeg files.

Nearby in the hub of galleries close to the Royal Academy, Pace Gallery is showing some of the American Abstract Expressionists. The dominant figure in this group, at least from an historic perspective, is Kenneth Noland, and the show builds on this popularity by also including works from other important artists from that movement including Frank Bowling and Sam Gilliam. The former has poured paint down the canvas and despite the absence of a brush, has created an elegant and ordered painted surface, evidenced by the clean boarders on either side of a main channel that comprises a complex multi-layered surface of paint. Meanwhile, the latter artist has removed his canvases from their stretchers altogether. They have been bunched up into a few hanging points and suspended from the gallery walls.

The London art scene is buzzing right now with the Basquiet show at the Barbican. Today’s run actually takes in a concurrent show in the building’s second gallery, known as The Curve. John Akomfrah has collected a multitude of chemical containers with their coloured residues still visible in white plastic grooves. He has then suspended them from the ceiling where they mingle with the lighting to create a stunning spectacle of glowing white plastic. The artwork actually references the anthropocene, an emerging name for Earth’s most recent age, and one that is characterised by human influence rather than geological change. On this account, the artwork draws more attention, in fact, to the pollution of these chemical containers than to their sublime beauty. Perhaps also on this solemn note, it is where today’s blog comes to a close, though the run itself would take in David Blandy at Seventeen, Omar Ba at Hales Gallery, Alan Belcher at Greengrassi and Abel Auer at Corvi Mora, all offering great exhibitions over the rest of the day.

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Sanford Biggers of Massimo De Carlo on show, and for auction, at Phillips.

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Stan Douglas at Victoria Miro with a manipulation of a jpeg file. These familiar digital files, used for storing images, use clever techniques to compress them and the artist has intervened in some way to produce an image that reveals this underlying technique as an image of its own.

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Frank Bowling often represented in London by Hales Gallery on show here at Pace Gallery.

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Sam Gilliam at Pace Gallery with a detached canvas.

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John Akomfrah represented by Lisson Gallery showing at Barbican. These are chemical containers that the artist has used to represent, with some beauty, the Anthropocene, our current geological time period by some accounts.

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David Blandy of Seventeen Gallery with a digital reconstruction of the solar system.

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Omar Ba of Hales Gallery draws on the experiences of his native Senegal to develop his rich symbolic language in paintings.

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Alan Belcher at Greengrassi with paintings of geometric objects that accompany, in his show, paintings of ducks, fish and shellfish each having a surreal quality.

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Abel Auer of Corvi Mora.